Oakley Could Add 130 Affordable Senior Apartment Units on Main Street

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On Tuesday, the Oakley City council will discuss a new project that will develop mixed-use on a 5.85 acre property that will consists of a 3-story, 130-unit, age-restricted and affordable senior apartment complex with street-fronting commercial space.

The city received an application from Highridge Costa Development Company for a Conditional Use Permit, Design Review, and Density Bonus Housing Agreement at 2605 Main Street. Staff is requesting they approve the “Twin Oaks Senior Residence Mixed-Use Project).

The project would be located on the south of Main Street just east of the Oakley Town Center which has Lucky’s, Rite Aid, and other shops. Summer Creek Place, an existing 1- and 2-bedroom, ground-level, senior apartment complex lies to the southwest of the site and directly south of the shopping center.

According to City Manager Bryan Montgomery, if approved, the project would include paying a CFD annual assessment to Fire. Although the calculation is not done yet, it would be significantly higher than the homes that currently have the fee–Condition of Approval #69.

According to the Staff Report, here is the project plan:

Proposed Site Plan

The proposed project is designed with parking and drive aisles between the buildings and property lines, and an active courtyard at the center between the buildings. Vehicle access is derived off of Main Street from a driveway separated with the main project entry sign. Additional access between the site and Oakley Town Center to the west may be made available in the future dependent upon agreement between the property owners. Also, an Emergency Vehicle Access (“EVA”) is proposed at the terminus of Edgewood Drive to the east of the project site. This EVA would be blocked off to non-emergency vehicles.

The rear (southern) portion of the site will be developed as a passive park with a preserved oak tree, walking paths, and landscaping. Development specs for the proposed project consist of a 3-story apartment building with 130 units (98 1-bedroom; 32 2-bedroom), and 188 parking spaces (133 for residents, 33 for visitors, and 22 for shoppers). There is over 63,000 sq. ft. of open area and apx. 16,000 sq. ft. of landscaping throughout the site. The building area totals approximately 114,000 sq. ft.

The entire ground floor frontage of the project along Main Street consists of the public retail portion in the northwest corner of the building (5,667 sq. ft.), and other uses related to the residential portion of the project, such as the leasing office, lobby, clubhouse, common area, library, fitness, conference and storage rooms, and laundry facilities.

The resident courtyard, located at the center of the site, includes a majority of the on-site resident amenities, including the pool and pool cabanas, spa/hot tub, BBQs, shuffle board, bocce court, garden furniture, vegetable beds, and two of the three preserved oak trees with protected canopy drip lines (i.e. no access beneath or activity beneath).

Architecture

As seen in the Applicant’s Plans, the project architect (SVA Architects) sought inspirations for the design by studying architectural expressions and main elements on buildings within the City of Oakley, specifically newer architecture along Main Street. Several Oakley buildings are shown on the plans as inspiration for the project design, including City Hall and the buildings across the street in the downtown plaza (La Costa and Buon Appetito), Fire Station 51 (O’Hara Avenue), and Grocery Outlet.

As a result, proposed building architecture mainly consists of tiled roof, white and earth-tone fine sand-finished Stucco, and stone veneer. Front-facing gables, smaller pyramid tower elements, and color block style main walls make up the building massing. Where additional space is located between windows, false shutters are often used to reduce the amount of blank wall. Decorative black-coated metal is often uses as balcony barriers and it matches other detail elements such as external light housings.

The plans include color elevations as well as 3D perspective renderings. Main Street’s frontage of the project shows the retail to the right with a slightly different roofline, which was done intentionally to distinguish it from the residential units and related non-unit uses (e.g. library, leasing office).

 

Landscaping and Fencing

The proposed landscape plan is provided as an illustration and includes a legend and notes. There are eight species of trees proposed to be planted and three existing coastal live oaks proposed to be preserved onsite. A Mediterranean garden with an additional 15 plant species is proposed. This garden will use naturally drought tolerant plants that show seasonal color. Decorative landscaping proposed throughout the site will be used to tie buildings and open spaces together. An additional 11 plant species will make up these areas, which will focus on lush flowering plants, ornamental grasses, and groundcovers. Vehicle gates and perimeter fencing are proposed as ornamental, black steel fencing, similar in appearance to traditional wrought-iron design.

Density Bonus Housing Agreement

A Density Bonus Housing Agreement (“DBA”) is required in order to develop the site at a density greater than that allowed by the municipal code, which allows a maximum 16.7 dwelling units per gross acre (“du/ga”). Since this project is proposed to be 100% affordable, the Applicant has requested the maximum density bonus as required by [California] Density Bonus Law (GC 69915-65918) of 35%, as set forth by OMC section 9.1.412 (Residential Density Bonus and Incentives) subsection d.2. The density bonus calculation is as follows:

  • No DBA = 98 Units: Allowable maximum density under M17 District. [5.85 acres * 16.7 du/ga = 97.70 (would be rounded to 98)].
  • DBA = 132 Units: Allowable maximum density with DBA: [97.70 * 1.35 = 131.90 (rounded to 132)].

At 130 dwelling units, the proposed project would comply with the maximum allowable number of units when applying the 35% density bonus increase. In order to implement this increase in density, the developer and City must enter into a DBA, which the City Council must find to be in compliance with state law and approve for City Manager execution prior to recordation. Staff has included a stand-alone resolution with the DBA for consideration with this project.

Staff Report:https://legistarweb-production.s3.amazonaws.com/uploads/attachment/pdf/442656/SR_TwinOaks_10-08-19.pdf
Public Hearing Notice: https://legistarweb-production.s3.amazonaws.com/uploads/attachment/pdf/442638/PHN_TwinOaks_10-08-19_CC.pdf

If you go
Oakley City Council Meeting

Oct. 8, 2019 at 6:30 pm
3231 Main Street, Oakley CA


6 COMMENTS

  1. Everybody knows that “affordable” “senior apartments” is code word for something else. Look at the debacle over on Carol Lane if you want to see a great example of what this means. The folks at the businesses in the Raley’s shopping center could elaborate, I’ve talked with many of them and the general consensus is negative. City council, I hope you read this and I hope you get it that this is NOT a good idea. The land would be better left unused- seriously! I’d rather have us pay a fine to the state, like cities on the 680 corridor do, to avoid these types of structures that generally do not bring a lot of value to Oakley. I don’t feel these urban density standards like you’re seeing get pushed all over the state are best applied to Oakley.

  2. Good! I’ll throw my parents- who keep voting republican- into this place.

    Old folks don’t seem to get it. They vote for people who want to take away their healthcare.

    • Your vote is the reason these places are taken advantage of and plugged up with non contributing citizens. You probably don’t set an alarm clock either. Take your mess somewhere else. You have all but ruined this state.

  3. Oh good!! More high density shit hole housing!! So all the hood rats can move in with grandma-ma !! The idiot,so called “city manager” Montgomery and his band of idiots on the shitty council continue to ruin Oakley.
    These idiots need to go!!

  4. Yeah I challenge anyone including City leaders to go “Visit” the commons and ask the elderly folks how well it’s working out for them. SCAM!!!!! And a damn shame that these city leaders would try to sell this flawed journey with its citizens just to generate revenue.

  5. hell no oakley is already over populated with the leaders approving raises for themselves bull shit oakley doesnt want to turn in brentwood antioch.

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