Wicks’ Seeks “Privacy for All” to Expand Consumer Protections for Personal Information

Press Release

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Photo provided by Asm Buffy Wicks Twitter

Sacramento, Calif. — Assemblymember Buffy Wicks (D-Oakland) is championing AB 1760, “Privacy for All” to strengthen California’s consumer privacy laws by giving consumers additional control of how their personal information is shared and tools to hold companies accountable.

“Companies are making enormous profits off the sharing, use, and even abuse of consumers’ data—we need to level the playing field,” said Wicks. “Consumers should have the right to find out what data companies have collected on them, how that information is being used, and to stop their personal information from being shared and sold.”

In 2018, California took an important step toward increasing privacy protections for consumers by enacting the Consumer Privacy Act (AB 375 / SB 1121). Privacy for All will build on last year’s efforts by:

  • Requiring companies to have consumers opt-in for the use and sharing of personal information;
  • Limiting use of personal information to what consumers would expect based on the service;
  • Giving consumers the right to know what personal information companies have about them, how their personal information is being used, and who it is being shared with;
  • Ensuring that companies can’t charge higher prices or provide inferior service to punish consumers for exercising their privacy rights; and
  • Providing legal recourse so Californians can go to court to force companies to follow the law and respect their rights.

Advocates from the American Civil Liberties Union of California, Common Sense Kids Action, the Council of American-Islamic Relations – California, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, and the Greenlining Institute will join Assemblymember Wicks in Sacramento to announce the bill.

“Privacy is a civil and human right for all Californians. For far too long, tech companies have been able to play fast and loose with our personal information – and Cambridge Analytica, massive data breaches, and online discrimination have been the result. It’s time to make sure rights are real for all Californians and we have the power to protect our privacy, personal safety, and financial security. It’s time to pass Privacy for All,” said Nicole Ozer, Technology and Civil Liberties Director for the ACLU of California.

“Consumers are fed up with seeing their personal information secretly collected and sold without their consent. We are proud of how the CCPA gives consumers more control, and will defend the new law against anti-privacy profiteers who seek to weaken it,” said Joe Ridout, spokesman for Consumer Action.

In an age where people’s shopping, finances, and identities are increasingly online, being in control of one’s life requires being in control of one’s personal information. But that control is being taken from consumers by companies that are seeking to profit from their personal information. AB 1760 puts some of that control back in the hands of consumers so they can safeguard their privacy, livelihoods, safety, and civil rights.

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Assemblymember Buffy Wicks represents California’s 15th Assembly District, which includes all or portions of the cities of Oakland, Richmond, Berkeley, Emeryville, Albany, El Cerrito, San Pablo, Pinole, El Sobrante, Hercules, Kensington, and Piedmont. You can learn more about Asm. Wicks at a15.asmdc.org

 

Voices for Restoring and Reforming Redevelopment AB 1760, “Privacy for All”

“EFF thanks Assemblymember Wicks for leading the charge on consumer privacy to strengthen the California Consumer Privacy Act. The Pew Research Center reports more than 90 percent of Americans feel they have lost control of their personal information when they go online. EFF stands ready to re-empower the public so that using the Internet does not mean surrendering their right to privacy,” said Ernesto Falcon, Legislative Counsel at the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

“Californians want and deserve the strongest privacy protections,” said Jim Steyer, CEO of Common Sense Media. “Privacy for All builds on the landmark California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 by strengthening important protections that keep Californians in step with the rest of the world. To do that we need notice and consent, data minimization, and a strong enforcement arm that includes private right of action. We commend Assemblymember Wicks for standing up for California families and leading the way for the rest of the country.”

“With more than 11 billion individual records breached in the U.S. since 2005 and the numerous scandals exposed just in the last year, companies that collect, use and share our information have given us little reason to trust them. It’s time for Californians to stop feeling powerless when it comes to protecting their information—it’s time we had Privacy for All,” said Meghan Land, who serves as Executive Director for Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.

“Consumer Reports thanks Assemblymember Wicks for her leadership in sponsoring this bill. The California Consumer Privacy Act was an important first step, but consumers still need the power to make their own choices about their privacy, and assurance that companies that abuse those rights will be held accountable. We urge the legislature to take up these important reforms as soon as possible,” said Maureen Mahoney, who serves as Policy Analyst at Consumer Reports.

“We applauded California last year for taking the first big step to enact online privacy protections and now it’s time for the state to build on that initiative by strengthening consumers’ rights and enhancing the ability to enforce them,” said Susan Grant, Director of Consumer Protection and Privacy for the Consumer Federation of America.


2 COMMENTS

  1. Some idiot paid $20 to one of those personal information-gathering websites and suddenly this idiot I never even heard of starts calling me and then my family members, relatives and friends! He now knows where I live and where I work and what I own! This is total insanity! I checked out a couple of these websites and told them to take me off their system immediately! They started giving me crap saying that this is LEGAL. Well, BULL! Let him just show up at my door and the police and then the coroner will be called!

  2. I had a similar experience Got a call out-of-the-blue from some guy I didn’t know. Said he saw my screen name in a chat room. Told me he knew my address and would come pay me a visit. He said he looked it up on GOOGLE EARTH and knows what my house looks like! Terrific! I told him that’s not a good idea.

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