Amber Alert Update: Oakland Police Arrest Dad For False Report

7

On Saturday night, the California Highway Patrol issued an Amber Alert on behalf of the Oakland Police Department after they say a 3-year-old child was taken from an unknown suspect.

A few hours later around 1:20 am Sunday, police say the child was located after being taken during a carjacking. A suspect was then in custody.

On Sunday, by 12:00 pm, police announced the father of the 3-year-old has been arrested for filing a false police report. Police say earlier in the day, the 3-year-old was with the father, but at the time the vehicle was stolen, the 3-year-old had been safe with the mother.

Police said the father lied to police in hopes that his car would be found quickly.

No further info was released.


7 COMMENTS

  1. 9 times out of 10 it’s the parent who has the kid. This amber alert, child paranoia spawned in the 1980’s with John Walsh. The “for the kids” rhetoric in this country is pathetic and hypocritical, just as the anti-abortion folks don’t give two $hits about the kid out of the womb.

  2. You have to be really stupid to claim your child was in the car just to get your car back. Cars are insured. What a low life.

  3. Kayla
    Actually, John Walsh had little to nothing to do with it. Although he did have everything to do with bringing better awareness, if not total panic, if our kids didn’t answer on the first call of their names. Congressman Martin Frost, with the help of Marc Klaas, drafted the Amber Hagerman Child Protection Act in 1996, not the 1980’s. In July 1996, Richard Hagerman and Bruce Seybert (his daughter was a friend of Amber Hagerman, which the Amber alert is named for) attended a media symposium in Arlington, TX and spoke about Amber Hagerman’s abduction. C.J. Wheeler, a reporter from radio station KRLD, approached the Dallas police chief shortly afterward with their ideas and launched the first ever Amber Alert. The acronym, which stands for America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response, also turns the name into a contrived acronym after Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old abducted and murdered in Arlington, Texas, in 1996.

Comments are closed.