Graduation Rates Up, Dropouts Down in East Contra Costa County

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California Dept. of Education

For the fourth year in a row, California’s graduation rate climbed as the dropout rate fell State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson announced Monday.

Statewide,  80.2 percent who started high school in 2009-10 graduated with their class in 2013. The numbers were even better in  Contra Costa County where they saw a graduation rate of 85.8 percent in 2012-2013.

The Antioch Unified School District saw its graduation rate increase from 74.4 in 2011-2012 to 77.6 in 2012-2013. In total they had 175 drop outs last year versus 262 district wide dropouts in 2011-2012.

Antioch High School saw a big increase in its graduation rate jumping from 78.7 in 2011-2012 to 86.7 in 2012-2013. Last year they had just 36 dropouts compared to 72 the year before. Deer Valley also saw an increase in graduation rates going from 90.2 in 2011-2012 to 93.9 in 2012-2013. Last year they had just 25 dropouts compared to 45 the year before

In the Liberty Union High District graduation rate remained steady as it hit 86.4 in 2012-203 which was up from the 86.3 in 2011-2012. District wide, they had 82 dropouts in 2012-2013 compared to just 60 in 2011-2012

Drop Outs in East Contra Costa County – 2012/2013

Antioch Unified School District

  • Antioch High School – 36
  • Deer Valley High School – 25
  • Dozier-Libbey Medical High – *
  • Prospects High – 51

Liberty Union High School District

  • Freedom High School – 12
  • Heritage High School – *
  • Independence High – 31
  • Liberty High School – *

Pittsburg Unified School District

  • Pittsburg Senior High – 90

An asterisk (*) appears on the Internet reports to protect student privacy where there are ten or fewer students.

To review the school graduation and drop out rates, visit http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/

Here is a Press Release from April 28

State Schools Chief Tom Torlakson Announces High School Graduation Rate Tops 80 Percent

LOS ANGELES—For the fourth year in a row, California’s graduation rate climbed as the dropout rate fell, particularly for students of color, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson announced today.

More than eight out of 10 students statewide, or 80.2 percent, who started high school in 2009-10 graduated with their class in 2013. That is up 1.3 percentage points from the year before (Table 1). Graduation rates among African-American and Hispanic students climbed faster than the statewide average, although the rates remained lower overall. Among African-American students, 67.9 percent graduated with their class in 2013, up 1.9 percentage points from the year before. Among Hispanic students, 75.4 percent graduated with their class, up 1.7 percentage points from the year before (Tables 2 and 3).

“For the first time in our state’s history, more than 80 percent of our students are graduating—a clear sign of their hard work and the support they receive from their teachers, families, and communities,” Torlakson said. “We are continuing toward our goal of graduating 100 percent of our students with the skills and knowledge they will need to succeed.”

Along with the rise in the graduation rate, there was a dip in the dropout rate. Of the students who started high school in 2009-10, 11.6 percent dropped out. That is down 1.5 percentage points from the 2011-12 dropout rate (Table 1). Again, the decline in dropout rates among African-American and Hispanic students compared favorably to the statewide rates. Among African-American students, 19.9 percent dropped out, down 2.2 percentage points from the year before. Among Hispanic students, 14.1 percent dropped out, down 2 percentage points from the year before (Tables 2 and 3).

Another 8.2 percent of students in the total cohort are neither graduates nor dropouts. That group is up 0.1 of a percentage point from 2011-12 (Table 1). A cohort refers to a particular group of students tracked over a given time period. These students either are non-diploma special education students (0.5 percent), other students who elected to take and then passed a high school equivalency test (in this instance, the General Educational Development [GED] Test) (0.2 percent), or still enrolled in school (7.5 percent).

Graduation and dropout rates for counties, districts, and schools across California were calculated based on four-year cohort information using the state’s California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS). This is the fourth time this four-year cohort information was calculated, meaning data may only be compared accurately over the four-year period from 2009-10 to 2012-13. Prior to 2009-10, graduation and dropout rates used different calculation systems and cannot be accurately compared to the cohort rates.

Cohort graduation rates are used to determine whether schools met their targets for increasing the graduation rate for Adequate Yearly Progress reporting under the federal accountability system. The cohort dropout rate is calculated for high school students grades nine through twelve, although some students drop out as early as middle school.

To view and download state, county, district, and school graduation and dropout rates, visit the California Department of Education’s DataQuest. Downloadable data sheets are available on the Cohort Outcome Data Web page. Caution is urged when comparing graduation or dropout rates across individual schools and districts. For example, some county office schools, alternative schools, or dropout recovery high schools serve only those students who are already at the greatest risk of dropping out, compared with the broader population at traditional high schools. Therefore, these individual schools and districts cannot be directly compared.

2 COMMENTS

  1. My response is that anything below 95% graduation rate, the school districts have failed our kids.

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